Selling to affluent customers: 9 essential tips

Patrycja Franczak

9 things I learned while selling to affluent people in international markets:

  1. “Disconnect” from the effect in your head

If you are desperate and you really care about the result. you usually get too excited and too easily you will start making any projections in your head (9 out of 10 will not be true). You will just waste your time and energy. I still teach my infuture.fashion team about that.

  1. Don’t be shy, high-quality leads (aka affluent customers) are also people

They watch Netflix, eat scrambled eggs for breakfast, they like to laugh – just like everyone else.

  1. Catch the problem

Your goal shouldn’t be to sell but to catch the real problem. Talk. Ask questions. Say what do you know that your clients don’t know, and how can it harm them?

  1. Don’t assume you know everything

Of course – you know how you can help and you believe that what you have is exactly what they need. But that’s a theory. If you don’t listen, you are pushing customers away. So make sure your definitions are the same. Let them decide.

  1. Be patient

Just because it’s the end of the year doesn’t mean you can rush your selling process and get your customer to buy. Some people will buy instantly, others will need years to think.

  1. Treat the “guards”, that is the people at the reception desk, as very influential people

Decision-makers spend a lot of time with them. More than with their loved ones. If you can’t break through reception – stop doing it. Many people are downright aggressive towards these people. Treating them as a stupid barrier. Talk to the person who manages the reception desk and freely ask questions about potential challenges. This person often knows a lot about the company and will help you if he/she wants to.

  1. Explore the industry knowledge and share important information with your prospects while asking how they solve given problems in the company.
  2. Compliment – especially if you would like to arrange regular coffee and networking. But don’t overdo it.
  3. Do follow up if someone didn’t reply to your email or didn’t pick up the phone (even if you called hundred times).

It is good if the follow up is not the same as the previous e-mail. Be creative. And don’t give up so easily. People are busy, bombarded by others and surprised by unexpected life events. Make sure you get an agreement with them on following up and then don’t hesitate to do so.

What would you say as 10❓

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